Ovarian Cancer

Mumps

Epidemiologic study of malignancies of the ovaries. 1966, West, Cancer

Unlike other types of cancer, whose risk increases with age, the risk of ovarian cancer increases till the age of 70, and then decreases sharply. The risk of ovarian cancer in Japan is much lower than in England and the US, where this type of cancer is becoming more common.
The authors analyzed the relationship between ovarian cancer and 50 different factors, and found that the only statistically significant factor associated with ovarian cancer was not having had mumps in childhood (p=0.007). In fact, not having had rubella as a child was also associated with ovarian cancer, but in this case p-value was equal to 0.02. Back then, scientists had slightly more self-respect, and p>0.01 was not considered statistically significant.
It was also found that the risk of ovarian cancer in unmarried women was significantly higher.

Mumps

Possible role of mumps in the etiology of ovarian cancer. 1979, Menczer, Cancer

Clinical mumps in childhood is associated with a reduced risk of ovarian cancer. Moreover, it turned out that patients with ovarian cancer had less mumps antibodies.
The authors believe that what influences the risk of ovarian cancer is not the actual mumps infection, but rather the subclinical course of the disease. In case of the subclinical disease (without symptoms, like after vaccination) less antibodies are produced, which is what subsequently protects against cancer.

Mumps

Mumps and ovarian cancer: modern interpretation of an historic association. 2011, Cramer, Cancer Causes Control

In addition to these two, seven more studies have been published on the association of mumps with the reduced risk of ovarian cancer. Nonetheless, the biological mechanism of this phenomenon has not been studied, and with the beginning of vaccination the connection between mumps and ovarian cancer became irrelevant, and was forgotten.
All but two of the studies found the protective effect of mumps against ovarian cancer. One of the two studies, which did not find the connection, did not even find the connection between pregnancy and ovarian cancer. The second study (the last one out of nine), was conducted in 2008, and already includes many more vaccinated people than the previous ones.
MUC1 is a membrane protein, which is associated with cancerous tumors. The authors found that women who have had mumps had much more antibodies to this protein than those who did not have mumps. This biological mechanism is what explains the protective function of mumps.
Mumps vaccine creates antibodies against the virus, but does not create antibodies against MUC1. To create these antibodies one needs to actually having mumps. Thus, it is possible to conclude that since symptomatic cases of mumps after the beginning of vaccinations are observed much less frequently, it will lead to an increase in the incidence of ovarian cancer. Indeed, the incidence of ovarian cancer among white women has already increased.
The authors also conducted a meta-analysis of the eight studies, and concluded that having had mumps decreases the risk of cancer by 19%.

Mumps

Oncolytic activities of approved mumps and measles vaccines for the therapy of ovarian cancer. 2005, Myers, Cancer Gene Ther

Ovarian cancer is the fourth leading cause of death among American women. 25 thousand women get diagnosed each year, and 16 thousand of them die. The authors analyzed three viruses: a recombinant measles virus and vaccine strains of mumps and measles, as treatment for ovarian cancer in vitro on mice. All three viruses successfully killed cancer cells. Despite the excellent results, they did not start using the virus as part of the conventional cancer therapy. Perhaps because this strain can cause complications of the nervous system.
The authors notice that since most people in Western countries are vaccinated against measles and mumps, the immune system can interfere with this type of therapy.

Mumps

Treatment of human cancer with mumps virus. 1974, Asada, Cancer

90 patients in terminal stage of cancer tried the mumps virus treatment (wild or almost wild strain). The virus was given orally, rectally, intravenously, by inhalation, by local injection, or simply by applying externally to the tumor. Since the researchers did not have enough virus, patients received only small amounts.
37 patients demonstrated very good results (the tumor disappeared completely or shrank by more than 50%), 42 patients had good results (the tumor shrank or stopped growing). Just few days later the patients had less pain and improved appetite, and within two weeks the tumor disappeared completely in many patients. Side effects were minimal. 19 patients were cured completely.

Mumps

Attenuated mumps virus therapy of carcinoma of the maxillary sinus. 1979, Sato, Int J Oral Surg

Two patients with maxillary sinus carcinoma got injected with the mumps virus (Urabe strain). Their pain was immediately alleviated and the tumor regressed. However, later they still died of exhaustion.

Measles

A case study of carcinoma of the ovary. 1977, Newhouse, Br J Prev Soc Med

Measles is associated with a 53% reduction in the risk of ovarian cancer, 39% in mumps, 38% in rubella, 34% in chickenpox. Pregnancy is associated with a 73% reduction in the risk of ovarian cancer

Measles

In 2014 a woman was cured of multiple myeloma by a huge dose of a recombinant measles virus
At present, clinical trials of the treatment of various cancers by means of the measles virus are underway. [Here reported the successful use of the virus to treat skin cancer in five patients. Here on how the measles virus destroys melanoma cells.
Measles virus has also been used successfully for treatment of ovarian cancer [1], [2]. The virus was much more effective avastina, fashionable for today, a very toxic and very expensive cancer drug.

Лицензия Creative Commons Content above is licenced under Creative Common Attribution—NonCommercial—NoDerivatives (CC BY-NC-ND) licence,
i.e. it is free for non-commercial distribution and citation with this reference being provided: scibook.org, amantonio, using the content to create another product or meaning is prohibited.
scibook.org, 2017-2019