Human Chorionic Gonadotropin

Tetanus

A vaccine that will reduce pregnancy in women. 1994, Talwar, PNAS

hCG (Human Chorionic Gonadotropin) is a hormone, which is released during pregnancy, and which the home pregnancy test is based on.
Since this hormone is absolutely necessary for the development of pregnancy, scientists came up with a brilliant idea. They thought that if they could trigger an autoimmune reaction to this hormone, the immune system would begin to see it as a pathogen and destroy it. And that would make a vaccine against pregnancy.
How to trigger an immune response to a hormone? Simply by adding aluminum and tetanus toxoid to it. The immune system will now produce antibodies to hCG, in addition to the tetanus antibodies. Said and done. They started with this back in the ‘70s, but it did not work. And in the early ‘90s, another adjuvant was added to the vaccine – sheep lutropin (the hormone responsible for the ovulation) and diphtheria toxoid, and the vaccine started to work! Of course, the level of antibodies was constantly decreasing, so the vaccine had to be injected once every few months, but the Hindu women, on whom the vaccine was tested, almost never got pregnant. Although, some researchers accuse the author of this experiment of skipping the preliminary animal testing, and doing the testing on women right away. And Maneka Gandhi, the former Minister of the Environment of India, claims that his contraceptive vaccine for male dogs killed too many of them.
Similar vaccines were also being developed under the guidance of WHO by other research groups (page 18).

Tetanus

Tetanus vaccine may be laced with anti-fertility drug. International/developing countries. 1995, Vaccine Wkly

(full text)
In the fall of 1994, the World Health Organization held a tetanus vaccination campaign in Mexico. For some reason, however, the vaccine was given exclusively to women of reproductive age (15-45 y.o.). And despite the fact, that one dose of tetanus vaccine gives protection for 10 years, the women were vaccinated five times. A Catholic organization, Human Life International, found it strange and decided to check these vaccines for hCG, and indeed, it turned out the vaccine contained it. Similar tetanus vaccines, containing hCG, were found in the Philippines, where 3.4 million women were vaccinated, and in Nicaragua, where only women aged 12-49 were vaccinated.

Tetanus

In 2014, WHO and UNICEF held a vaccination campaign for women of childbearing age (14-19 y.o.) in Kenya. Women received five doses of the vaccine. The Church usually carries out vaccination in Kenya, but this time the WHO carried out the vaccinations itself. The Organization of Catholic Bishops in Kenya found it strange and decided to send that vaccine for testing into four different labs. According to the Bishops’ statement, all labs found hCG in the tested vials.
WHO and UNICEF explained the vaccination of women of childbearing age by the fact that the vaccines were intended to prevent neonatal tetanus. However, according to the WHO statistics, in five years prior to this campaign, only 19 cases of neonatal tetanus have been recorded in Kenya (population of Kenya is 46 million people). The need for five doses of the vaccine (instead of the regular one or two) was never explained.
One of the labs stated, that they had no knowledge that what they were testing was a vaccine. Had they known, they certainly would not have found hCG there. Another lab's license was revoked after it refused to falsify the results.

Tetanus

HCG Found in WHO Tetanus Vaccine in Kenya Raises Concern in the Developing World. 2017, Oller, OAlib

- WHO has been working on development of pregnancy vaccine since 1970s.
- WHO has been working on the issue of reducing birth rates in third world countries since 1945.
- The US government has been officially supporting the decline in birth rates in third world countries since 1970s.
- The vaccination protocol used in Kenya (5 doses every six months) completely coincided with the pregnancy vaccination protocol, and did not coincide with the tetanus vaccination protocol.
- Vaccines in Kenya were guarded by the police. Each vial had to be returned to WHO under the police supervision. All vaccines were kept in a hotel in Nairobi, and distributed only from there.
- Half of the vials provided by WHO for testing contained hCG.
- Women vaccinated against tetanus in the Philippines had hCG antibodies.
The authors believe that WHO is responsible for depopulation in Kenya.

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